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Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites (Read 19112 times)

Started by Just No Point, October 27, 2015, 04:36:57 pm
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Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#1  October 27, 2015, 04:36:57 pm
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How Do I...? A M.U.G.E.N primer

Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites

M.U.G.E.N, Elecbyte (c)1999-2009
Updated 17 September 2009


Tutorial 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Introduction

If you want to make a character for M.U.G.E.N, you'll need a good understanding of how every component of a character works. Because jumping straight into the technical documentation can be confusing, we've written a tutorial to help you get started. As you gain more understanding, be sure to refer to the docs often. You may stumble or get stuck several times as you make your first character, but like anything else, once you know the basics it becomes easier and faster to make progress.


In this tutorial you will learn how to make a palette for your character, and how put together your character's sprites. Also, you'll see how to make a simple animation action. In Part 2 of the tutorial, you'll see how to define bounding boxes for your animations, and in Part 3 and 4 we'll define a simple attack. For this tutorial, you'll need an image editing program such as GIMP, PhotoShop, or PaintShop Pro.


We'll assume you have at least basic knowledge of text editors, graphics editing, game concepts, and how to navigate at a command prompt. If you're not familiar with all of these, we recommend you do some reading up in beginner books or websites. If you have some background in programming languages, you may find it a lot easier to understand our docs. All right, now let's begin.


1. Making a palette

All the sprites belonging to a character need to be 256-color PNG files. Every sprite should have the same 256-color palette in order for them to be displayed correctly in-game. If you are experienced with Photoshop, the following part will be simple. We will assume you are starting with a true-color image (called RGB in Photoshop).

When converting sprites to 256 colors (also known as Indexed Color), most paint programs will make the palette however which way they like, and they'll do it differently for each sprite. Here we'll cover how to make a standard palette, and how to apply it to each sprite..

With Photoshop, go to Image->Mode->Indexed Color.

A window will pop up. In this window, set the palette to Exact. If you're using Photoshop 5 or higher, don't click on OK yet. For earlier versions of Photoshop, click OK, then convert to RGB (Image->Mode->RGB Color), then click on Image->Mode->Indexed Color again.

Now, select Custom in the palette roll-down list to bring up the Color Table window. The next step is to make sure the background color of your sprite has a color index of 0 (we'll call this "color 0"). In M.U.G.E.N, color 0 is the masking color. This means that all the parts of a sprite that are color 0 will not be drawn.

Color index 0 should always be the background color. The actual color (not the index value) is up to you.

In Photoshop's color table editor, set the top left color (that's color index 0 in Photoshop) to be the background color of the sprite. You will want to make sure that color 0 is a unique color in your palette, otherwise Photoshop will not set the color indices correctly. To do this, you can take the old color 0 color and put it where the bg color used to be (swap the two colors essentially).

Note: If you have used versions of M.U.G.E.N prior to 1.0, the preferred file format used to be PCX instead of PNG. In Photoshop, PCX files have the bottom right color as index 0. With PNG files, it is the top left color.

Example of a correct palette with background color as color 0 (green in the top left corder).

Result of using incorrect palette. Result of using correct palette.

Click on the Save button to save this palette (we will call it player.act for the purpose of this tutorial). Now click OK to apply the palette to this image, and the save the file as a PNG file.

The next step is to convert all your other images to this palette that you just created (player.act). You can use the following method:

  • Open the first image, then click on Image -> Mode -> Indexed Color.
  • Select Custom from the Palette list, and click on Load to select the palette file you just made (player.act). Hit OK until you are back at the main window.
  • Now save it as a PNG file, and repeat for the rest of your images.

Palette design is very important early on when making your sprites. Although M.U.G.E.N lets you use up to 255 colors for each sprite, a character with a well-designed palette does not necessarily have to use all the available colors indices. Working with a limited number of colors not only decreases the size of the PNG files, but also makes it easier to create alternate palettes (different color schemes) later on. Pixel sprite art done by hand is easier with a small set of colors (16 to 32), but can become tedious when you have a large palette to work with. On the other hand, pre-rendered sprites may look better with a larger range of colors, at the cost of little extra work. Keep these points in mind when designing your character's palette.


2. How do I start making a character?

Go to the chars/ directory and make a new directory for your character. Let's call this character "Player", for an example (replace "player" with whatever you want to call your character). In this case, make a directory called chars/player.

3. What does this character need?

You'll need to have these in the chars/player directory:

player.air
player.cmd
player.cns
player.def
player.sff
player.snd
To see what each of these files are, read the Overview included in the docs/ directory of the M.U.G.E.N zip file.
In this tutorial, you'll make player.sff, the sprite file.

4. How do I start making these files?

You can make them all from scratch... Or, you can start by using our example character Kung Fu Man (KFM). KFM's character directory is located in chars/kfm/, and his work files are in work/kfm/.

5. OK, I got KFM. Now what?

The first thing to do is to copy over and rename the files needed for your character. Assuming your player's directory name is "player", these are the files you should copy:


chars/kfm/kfm.air -> chars/player/player.air
chars/kfm/kfm.cns -> chars/player/player.cns
chars/kfm/kfm.cmd -> chars/player/player.cmd
chars/kfm/kfm.def -> chars/player/player.def
What are these files? These 4 files are all in text format, which you can edit in a text editor such as MS-DOS EDIT or Windows WordPad. Here is a list of each of these files, what they do, and their corresponding technical documentation files.
  • .air - Animation data. This describes how your sprites will be animated. (AIR format)
  • .cns - Constants and states. This is where you define your character's state machine. It is the core of how a character behaves. (CNS format, Expressions)
  • .cmd - Move command definitions. The .cmd defines which input move commands trigger which attack states. It works with the .cns file to define how your character reacts to keyboard or joystick input. (The CMD file)
  • .def - Files and basic information about a character (The DEF file)


Spoiler: Original Tutorial Use this if you don't wish to use Fighter Factory and wish to use SPRMaker2 (click to see content)

First you want to get Fighter Factory. You can find it here. Or use the Mirror here

Install Fighter Factory and run the program.
You should see the screen below (not including the character of course)


Let's break down what we will need for this tutorial. They are numbered on the image in red
1. Projects: You will use this to open or start new projects.
2. Definitions
3. Sprites: This is the current screen we have open in the example pic
4. Add one or more sprites
5. Load a new image for the sprite from a file
6. Save one or more sprites as image files
7. Save sprites: saves the sff
8. Duplicate the current sprite
9. Delete the current sprite
10. Delete a group of sprites
11. Find/replace text in a single line
12. Remove free borders from the sprite: Crop the image
13. Rename a group of sprites
14. Open the image editor
15. Scroll bar to scroll through sprites
16. Sprite Group Number
17. Sprite Index Number
18. axis
19. Decompress on load: pending details
20. Show transparency color: This will allow you to see the border of the sprites too
21. Switch to the sprite palette: pending details
22. OnionSkin: Use this to create a greyed duplicate sprite useful for aligning axis
23. OnionSkin scroll bar: Useful to scroll the sprites to be used for onionskin
24. Organizer: Use this to organize the order of the sprites and palettes

Fighter Factory can accept .pcx and .png file formats.

This tutorial will presume you are starting from scratch and have sprites available and ready.
To begin go to Projects > New to start a new character.
We will walk you through the various screens now.

For this example we will choose Empty. True type Fonts: Pending The only template that comes by default is Winane ai which is used to aid developers make ai for characters that use winmugen and should not be used with 1.0+


Should be self explanatory

Now that that is finished we can start.

To set up your character's basic information, open player.def using the Definitions tab. Change the fields to the appropriate values. For example:

; Player information
[Info]
name = "Player"             ;Name of character
displayname = "Player"      ;Name of character to display
versiondate = 09,09,2009    ;Version date of character (MM-DD-YYYY)
mugenversion = 1.0          ;Version of M.U.G.E.N character works on
author = "My Name"          ;Character author name
pal.defaults = 1,2,3,4      ;Default palettes in order of preference (up to 4)
                            ;Numbering starts from 1
localcoord = 320,240        ;Local coordinate space width and height

; Files for the player
[Files]
cmd     = player.cmd        ;Command set
cns     = player.cns        ;Constants
st      = player.cns        ;States
stcommon = common1.cns      ;Common states (from data/ or motif)
sprite  = player.sff        ;Sprite
anim    = player.air        ;Animation
sound   =                   ;Sound (leave blank if none) *** Set to blank for now ***
ai      = kfm.ai            ;AI hints data (not used)

; Arcade mode
[Arcade]
intro.storyboard =     ;*** Set to blank for now ***
ending.storyboard =    ;*** Set to blank for now ***

Now we can open the Sprites tab and begin adding sprites. The 1st thing you will see is


In the above image you see how you will apply the axis, name the group and index, and apply the palette.
You are also asked if you wish to crop the image. This will crop after the axis is applied. Before release be sure all sprites are cropped to lower the size of the sff.

The group number and image number you enter for each sprite is used to access it in the .air (animation) file. It's just a pair of numbers you will associate with the sprite.


The palette bares some explanation.
The Reversed Check Box will flip your palette. In most cases this is needed if you are saving with PhotoShop.

Image's palette if not already added: If you have no sprites you will want to start with this. Or if you are adding new sprites that have their own palette.

Force the specified palette (adapt the image): This will force your current palette onto the sprite and change colors that are nearest to the values in the palette;

Exchange with the specified palette: This allows you to apply the palette of the group/index sprite listed below. This is what you will most likely use once you have added the character sprites and wish to add more.

Group number 0 is used for standing frames. You can check the AIR docs and Optional Animation Standards later for recommended numbers for other animation actions. The image number just specifies which image it is within a particular group number. You have to get your own X and Y axis from your sprite. For standing frames, it is usually at the very bottom in the middle of the sprite. For jumping sprites, the axis is usually in the where the character's feet would be if they were standing. That usually is in the center below the sprite. You can check KFM's sprites by running M.U.G.E.N and pressing Ctrl-C while playing. This will bring up the characters' bounding boxes and axes. Here are some examples of axis positions.

The positioning of your axes is very important. If they are slightly off between sprites, you will notice your sprites "jittering" around. If you make bigger errors, your sprites can end up appearing in completely wrong places.

And that's pretty much it. Repeat for each new sprite(s).

Be sure to save often. When it is time to save you will see the following.


Choose yes. At this point most document readers can read UTF-8


This is where you will choose which MUGEN version/sff format you wish to use for your sff.

MUGEN Beta is WinMugen. It uses SFFv1 which is not able to use remappal.

1.0 allows you to use multiple palettes within the sff and remappal

1.1 allows you to use multiple palettes within the sff and remappal and 32bit images that can have more than 256 colors.

6. I made the SFF. What's next?

Okay, now that you have the standing sprites in player.sff, it's time to animate your character. To make the standing animation, you have to create an action for it (an action is a block of text that describes one sequence of sprites to display). Open up player.air in the animations tab, and let's get ready to add a standing animation action. If your player.air is a copy of kfm.air, you can simply edit the appropriate action group (action 0 for standing animation).


It's time to make player.air. If you've read the AIR docs, you'll know the format for .air is:


Group number, image number, X offset, Y offset, game-ticks, [options]
Don't worry about the lines that start with Clsn2 and Clsn2Default for now.


; Standing Animation
[Begin Action 0]   ;Action 0 is the standing animation
Clsn2Default: 2
 Clsn2[0] = -10,  0, 10,-79
 Clsn2[1] =  -4,-92,  6,-79
0,3, 0,0, 7  
;The above line means to use sprite (0,3) (ie. group 0, image number 3) and 
;display it for 7 game-ticks.  1 game-tick is 1/60 of a sec, so 60 
;ticks is 1 second.  Group 0 Image 3 is stand03.pcx.
0,2, 0,0, 7
0,1, 0,0, 7
0,0, 0,0, 7
0,1, 0,0, 7
0,2, 0,0, 7
;end of file

Now, save this file and you're ready to see how your character looks!


7. Checking out your actions

If all the files are in the right place, you can directly load your character with M.U.G.E.N by typing at the command prompt:


mugen player player

This is a shortcut for versus mode. For now, don't worry if you see warnings at the top of the screen. Warnings are a sign that there's something wrong or missing in your character. In this case, your character might be missing required sprites or animation actions.

If you find a sprite too high up, as if it is floating above the ground, you'll have to move the axis higher up. Just remember that the axis is on ground-level when the character is on the ground. Likewise, if your character is too far forwards, move the axis right. Once you've adjusted the axes for all the sprites correctly, your character shouldn't be sliding or fidgeting around during the animation.

If you accidentally entered a sprite group+image number that doesn't exist, then nothing will be drawn. So if you see your character blinking out, you should go back and check your .air file to see if the numbers correspond to the ones in used for building your .sff.


8. Continuing with Actions and Sprites

After making the standing frames, you can proceed to walking, then jumping. Now that you know the basics of making sprites and actions, you should continue by making the required sprites from The Sprite Standard and required actions from the Reserved Action Numbers in the AIR docs. When you're done, all the warnings at the top of the screen should go away.



In part 2 of the tutorial, you'll be able to define your character's bounding boxes so they can get hit and hit other characters. Finally, we'll show you how to define some attacks in the .cns.

Tutorial 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Next is Tutorial Part 2




Feel free to post links to your favorite tutorials in this thread as well as discuss the content
Last Edit: November 18, 2015, 03:06:06 am by Just No Point
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#2  October 27, 2015, 04:40:55 pm
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The link to exp.html for the expressions documentation is dead.

Is this somewhere else? Any info on this missing doc?
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#3  November 17, 2015, 06:40:43 pm
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Updated the sff tutorial to use Fighter Factory

Can someone explain the following a bit for me?
What exactly is Decompress on load for?
Switch to the sprite palette?

When opening a character I presume Tru Type Font template would be used to load true type fonts for a fnt file?
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#4  November 19, 2015, 02:23:26 pm
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Switch to the Sprite Palette does that on the sprite index change.
Meaning if you're on say sprite 1920 of 2300, and you finally get out of your character and into the Effects.
The effects will probably use their own palettes. If Switch is activated FF3 automatically views the sprite in it's main palette.
If it's not checked, it'll use palette 1,0 or what ever palette the previous palette was.

This works well if you're in your character and un-check Switch to the Sprite and on an alt-palette. You can kinda see how ALL of your sprites will look with the second set of colors. If it IS checked and you switch to palette 1,1 and move down the list to the next sprite, it'll jump back to palette 1,0 showing you the default colors.
vVv Wheat Stage Released vVv
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#5  December 19, 2015, 05:03:21 pm
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Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#6  December 20, 2015, 07:22:03 am
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exp.html has no links or anything in it. As they didn't include it, it has not changed from the winmugen days and it's relatively short.

Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty


In M.U.G.E.N there is no magic button

They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.
Last Edit: December 20, 2015, 03:57:31 pm by Just No Point
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#7  December 20, 2015, 03:58:54 pm
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Ah, that's all in CNS anyway. Thanks. BTW, the edit I made to your post was merely to turn off smileys.
SFF V2 - information for a newcomer?
#8  July 08, 2016, 01:30:55 am
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Hello it's been a month since I'm a back to MUGEN, and I missed the "spotlight's moment of SFF V2", so..
Could anyone just explain the special features and/or diferences between a normal SFF and stuff..?
And How do I upgrade my current SFF to SFF v2? is it necessary to make a new one from scratch?


- I'm in the correct section right?
Re: SFF V2 - information for a newcomer?
#9  July 08, 2016, 05:51:35 am
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Advantages of using SFFV2:
  • can contain PNG sprites in addition to PCX
  • can contain your palettes (no need for .act files)
  • your small portrait (9000,0) does not share colors with your character (you can use any image you want for your small portrait)
  • can contain 24 bit (RGB) and 32 bit (RGBA) sprites (but only MUGEN 1.1 can display these)

To convert just the SSF to SFFV2:
  • Open the SFF using Fighter Factory 3
    Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty
  • Add your palletes
    Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty
  • Click to save the SFF
    Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty
  • Choose the format you want
    Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty

Now, if you are converting a char, open the entire char on FF3, make sure to set the correct mugenversion (1.0 or 1.1) and the localcoord on it's .def file
Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty
The localcoord indicates the resolution the char is supposed to work with, if you're converting from an existing character, the localcoord will probably be 320,240

Also, as there are no more .act files, remove them from the .def and add the Pallete Keymap section like this
Spoiler, click to toggle visibilty
In my example, if the player presses "x" while choosing the char, it will use pallete number 1, the "x2" means that the player must press "s" and "x" to choose that pallete

Now, if your char is using a custom common.cns (or, more spefically, a custom state 5900), you will need to add this to the state 5900:
Code:
[State 5900, 3] ;Change palette
type = RemapPal
trigger1 = 1
source = 1,1
dest = 1,palno
Now, just save the char and it should ask which format of SFF you want to use.

That is it, I hope this helps you ^^
Re: SFF V2 - information for a newcomer?
#10  July 08, 2016, 05:59:06 am
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I consider the SFF containing palettes a disadvantage, actually. It makes it harder for palette creators and selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set.

I also hate that the 9000,0 doesn't share colors in 1.1. It ruins the point of making a nice small portrait.


Unless you want to do on-the-fly palette swapping, there is absolutely no advantage to using SFFv2 other than better compression.
Re: SFF V2 - information for a newcomer?
#11  July 08, 2016, 06:52:54 am
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Advantages of using SFFV2:
  • can contain PNG sprites in addition to PCX
  • can contain your palettes (no need for .act files)
  • your small portrait (9000,0) does not share colors with your character (you can use any image you want for your small portrait)
  • can contain 24 bit (RGB) and 32 bit (RGBA) sprites (but only MUGEN 1.1 can display these)

YYes, that was the info I was looking for, thank you.
I was running FF3 couple days ago since I wanted to check out some sff v2's characters
do you see any disadvantage on using V2 format?
My current work is only compatible with 1.0 even though I'm using 1.1 to test my character against other ones.  :P
I think if I upgrade the SFF won't change that much
And there was something making noise on my about something you said:

can contain 24 bit (RGB) and 32 bit (RGBA) sprites (but only MUGEN 1.1 can display these)

you mean I can use a png rgb image for my stage works aimed for 1.1?  :o


I consider the SFF containing palettes a disadvantage, actually. It makes it harder for palette creators and selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set.
Oh god, I used to sepair each body part colour by colour

Unless you want to do on-the-fly palette swapping, there is absolutely no advantage to using SFFv2 other than better compression.

Oh, I've randomly read about that compression, would make a difference, I got a considerable size on my actual sff, that could help.

Last Edit: July 08, 2016, 06:57:00 am by gabe555
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#12  July 08, 2016, 03:53:01 pm
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I merged this here because it's good info for the MUGEN Class
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#13  July 08, 2016, 08:14:19 pm
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I consider the SFF containing palettes a disadvantage, actually. It makes it harder for palette creators and selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set.
I can see why it is harder for palette creators, but I don't see the problem with selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set... If the palettes are well organized, it shouldn't be a problem... Unless I missunderstood your point...

I also hate that the 9000,0 doesn't share colors in 1.1. It ruins the point of making a nice small portrait.
I don't see your point here... I mean, you can still make your nice small portrait using the same colors as the char, but it also allows you to use a completely different one.

you mean I can use a png rgb image for my stage works aimed for 1.1?  :o
Yes, you can, but I don't know if there is any extra thing you need to do in order to use them, I have never used one myself...
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#14  July 08, 2016, 11:20:25 pm
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I merged this here because it's good info for the MUGEN Class

Cool  ;)

you mean I can use a png rgb image for my stage works aimed for 1.1?  :o
Yes, you can, but I don't know if there is any extra thing you need to do in order to use them, I have never used one myself...

Alright, I'll give a try to those projects stages I abandoned time ago since I could'nt handle color loss

Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#15  July 09, 2016, 01:08:15 am
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I consider the SFF containing palettes a disadvantage, actually. It makes it harder for palette creators and selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set.
I can see why it is harder for palette creators, but I don't see the problem with selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set... If the palettes are well organized, it shouldn't be a problem... Unless I missunderstood your point...
You have to select the palettes through code if you have more than 12 and you want your users to actually be able to select them. It's not as easy as changing the filename in the .def.


I also hate that the 9000,0 doesn't share colors in 1.1. It ruins the point of making a nice small portrait.
I don't see your point here... I mean, you can still make your nice small portrait using the same colors as the char, but it also allows you to use a completely different one.
What? You could ALWAYS use a shitty 25x25 portrait that doesn't share at all; ⑨ did that all the time in his Melty Blood characters even in WinMUGEN. As a small portrait creator, I like it when characters have proper small portraits (not cropped sprites) that properly change with the character palette. 1.1 doesn't do that and that's what irritates me.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#16  July 09, 2016, 01:14:43 am
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As someone who finally got the dynamic of how exactly SFFv2 handles things, I can without question say that the older format is far more convenient, newb-friendly (most important), and less of a pain in general. Only issue is having more ACTs than necessary but swapping between them is simple, as opposed to having to open the SFF for new palettes.
Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 01:18:49 am by Niitris
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#17  July 09, 2016, 03:22:05 am
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I consider the SFF containing palettes a disadvantage, actually. It makes it harder for palette creators and selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set.
I can see why it is harder for palette creators, but I don't see the problem with selecting a set of 12 palettes from a large set... If the palettes are well organized, it shouldn't be a problem... Unless I missunderstood your point...
You have to select the palettes through code if you have more than 12 and you want your users to actually be able to select them. It's not as easy as changing the filename in the .def.
Oh, I get it now... I never had this problem before because I never make a lot of palettes... But now I can see how the old SFF is waaay more convenient than the SFFv2

I also hate that the 9000,0 doesn't share colors in 1.1. It ruins the point of making a nice small portrait.
I don't see your point here... I mean, you can still make your nice small portrait using the same colors as the char, but it also allows you to use a completely different one.
What? You could ALWAYS use a shitty 25x25 portrait that doesn't share at all; ⑨ did that all the time in his Melty Blood characters even in WinMUGEN. As a small portrait creator, I like it when characters have proper small portraits (not cropped sprites) that properly change with the character palette. 1.1 doesn't do that and that's what irritates me.
I never noticed that on MUGEN 1.1 and now I don't like this "feature" anymore... I assumed it wasn't possible before because I have aways seen people having problems with palettes on sprite 9000,0 and it was solved by making the sprite has the same palette as the char...
Well, looks like I have more things to learn about the SFF xD
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#18  July 09, 2016, 03:28:06 am
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I find the new method of adding palettes much simpler. I much prefer sffv2 for that reason.

Make a bunch of gif files that have indexed images of the palettes you want with their names and you just grab them all into the sff with FF3. No having to convert them all to .act or anything. Keep the images in the released char so ppl can visually see what palette they will get and all they have to do to change it is alter thepal number in the .def
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#19  July 09, 2016, 03:35:14 am
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The palettes are all the same format; just a 768 byte file of 256 colors. The ACT format is good at what it does. It's simple and easy to work with, whether you're a developer or a designer.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#20  July 09, 2016, 03:38:02 am
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I didn't know an easy way to batch save .act files from images ppl make when they give palettes.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#21  July 09, 2016, 03:46:53 am
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I could make a program for it, assuming they use PNG.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#22  July 09, 2016, 03:55:39 am
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That would be useful to a lot of people. Another good reason to use sffv2 is if you wish to use remappal. That's another reason I prefer it.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#23  July 09, 2016, 01:01:47 pm
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I have a problem with the transparency thing :/.

Once I put a sprite in Photoshop, the background colour(let's say a soft blue or a fucsia) usually is in the middle of the palette. I don't know how to change the position of it, so things can be started. If someone can help me... *_* !!

EDIT: I'll post an example of it, since my English is not the best around and I'm not sure if I expressed myself correctly. I'm about to leave now D:!!
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#24  July 09, 2016, 03:27:53 pm
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When you go to save your palette save as exact number of colors. Then choose force color. An empty index will appear and you can pick the color from your image and place it in the top left index. I like to do this on every color to keep a good order.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#25  July 09, 2016, 03:37:32 pm
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Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 08:42:29 pm by Jesuszilla
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#26  July 10, 2016, 02:03:10 am
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Remappal works with sffv1 as well. But you are limited to 12, and you can't make use of it within helpers with their own pal etc.

I like the small portait change, but that's just me. Never liked having my small ports change with the character palette.

I find sffv2 easier to manage. But i can understand the point of view from any palette editor and for anyone wishing to add/change the palettes the character uses it is a bit of a bitch. Previously it was put some files in the folder and alter names in a def file. Now you have to either swap out existing palettes or hope the creator has set up a "palette picker" within a seperate file.


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They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.
Re: Tutorial Part 1 - Getting started: sprites
#27  July 10, 2016, 01:28:33 pm
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Man, it was THAT easy? Dammmmmm!!! U_U!!!

Thanks JnP & JZilla :D!!